Tiger sighting in sundarban

Wildlife Sightings – A Bengal Tiger from the mangroves.


Sundarbans is the longest mangrove in the world where the Indian part of Sundarbans is estimated to be about 4,110 km2 (1,590 sq mi), of which about 1,700 km2 (660 sq mi) is occupied by waterbodies in the forms of river, canals and creeks of width varying from a few meters to several kilometres.

 

Image source: Wiki

All the rivers have a southward course towards the sea. The eco-geography of this area is totally dependent on the tidal effect of two flow tides and two ebb tides occurring within 24 hours with a tidal range of 3–5 m and up to 8m. The tidal action deposits silts back on the channels and raising the bed, it forms new islands and creeks. When the low tide starts, various other creatures emerge.

Like, this monitor lizard trying to feed on the mudskippers.

 

Two mudskippers on combat. You can see them sizing each other. These amphibious fish use their pectoral fins and pelvic fins to walk on the land during intertidal habitats. One might see during the low tide time. 

One has to navigate by boat around the islands on the main streams. The bushes at the edge of the mudflats give a feeling of the mysterious forest. It’s not uncommon for anyone to wonder, what could be behind those bushes and there is always anxiety of sighting the apex predator of this harsh habitat.

Birdwing has been traveling to Sundarbans in search of the mighty tiger and in our last tour, we had the best sighting of the apex predator all for ourselves.

 

Here is a short video which was made by our participant. It was one of the greatest wildlife sightings for everyone on that tour with Birdwing.

Video Credit: Arunkumar

 

Birdwing conducts regular photography tour to Sundarbans National Park. On these tours, we explore various streams looking for kingfishers, falcons, other birds and mammals. 

Join our upcoming tour to Sundarbans. Write to us at info[at]birdwing[dot]in to avail 5% discount right away.


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